Search Forums
University Of Metaphysical Sciences
University Of Metaphysical Sciences ->  General Public -> Metaphysics Discussion -> View Thread

You are logged in as a guest. ( logon | register )

Folk Traditions & Tales
Moderators: Moderators

Jump to page : 1
Now viewing page 1 [25 messages per page]
View previous thread :: View next thread
   General Public -> Metaphysics DiscussionMessage format
 
Paul Joseph
Posted 7/23/2008 4:55 AM (#7617)
Subject: Folk Traditions & Tales



PhD Alumni

200020001002525
Location: United Kingdom
Long been facinated by the above; some great folk songs criss-cross the Atlantic, and the north and south hemispheres; can be a great repository of suppressed or lost memories, teachings ,etc .. interested in other's rumintions on this .. we made passing reference before to a great academic work by Evans-Wentz (he who translated the Tibetan Book of the Dead), called, The Fairy Faith of the Celtic Peoples (or similar) - a collection of witness statements, sightings and oral tradition of encounters with fairies, as actual beings, from the British Isles and Ireland .... here, for example is a folk ballad that tells of a 'demon lover' (the link to the site at the foot gives access to a whole range of other traditional songs and ballads):

The Demon Lover

"O where have you been, long, long, love,
This long seven years and mair?
O I'm come to seek my former vows-
Ye granted me before. "

"O hold your tongue of your former vows
For they will breed sad strife;
O hold your tongue of your former vows,
For I am become a wife."

He turned him right and round about
And the tear blinded his e'e.
"I wad ne'er hae trodden on Irish ground
Had it not been for love of thee."

"I might have had a king's daughter
Far, far beyond the sea;
I might have had a king's daughter
Had it not been for love of thee."

"If ye might have had a king's daughter,
Yer self ye had to blame;
Ye might have taken the king's daughter,
Fer ye kend that I was nane."

"O false are the vows o' womankind,
But fair is their false bodie;
I ne'er wad hae trodden on Irish ground
Had it not been for love o' thee. "

"If I was to leave my husband dear,
And my two babes also,
O what have you to take me to,
If with you I should go? "

"I have seven ships upon the sea,
The eighth brought me to land;
With four-and-twenty bold mariners
And music on every hand."

She has taken up her two little babes,
Kissed them baith cheek and chin:
"O fare ye well, my ain two babes,
For I'll ne'er see you again."

She set her foot upon the ship,
No mariners could she behold;
But the sails were of the taffetie,
And the masts of the beaten gold.

She had not sailed a league, a league,
A league but barely three,
When dismal grew his countenance
And drumlie grew his e'e.

The masts that were like the beaten gold
Bent not on the heaving seas;
And the sails that were o'the taffetie
Filled not in the eastland breeze.

They had not sailed a league, a league,
A league but barely three,
Until she espied his cloven foot,
And she wept right bitterlie.

"O hold your tongue of your weeping," says he
"Of you weeping now let me be;
I will show you how the lilies grow
On the banks of Italy."

"O what hills are yon, yon pleasant hills,
That the sun shines sweetly on?"
"O yon are the hills of heaven," he said,
"There you will never win."

"O whaten a mountain is yon," she said,
"All so dreary wi' frost and snow?"
"O yon is the mountain of hell," he cried,
"Where you and I will go."

And aye when she turned her round about,
Aye, taller he seemed to be;
Until that the tops of the gallant ship
Nae taller were than he.

The clouds grew dark and the wind grew loud,
And levin filled her e'e;
And waesome wailed the snow-white sprites
Upon the girlie sea.

He strack the tapmast wi' his hand
The foremast wi' his knee
And he brake the gallant ship in twain
And sank her in the sea.

Child #243
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/song-midis/songs-midis-D1.html

Edited by Paul Joseph 7/23/2008 5:00 AM
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Paul Joseph
Posted 7/31/2008 4:06 AM (#8068 - in reply to #7617)
Subject: RE: Folk Traditions & Tales



PhD Alumni

200020001002525
Location: United Kingdom
Magic Cara !

NE brought us Japanese, now you are bringing us Welsh ... it is said to be the original language of the Britons, I think, who evacuated to Wales from the Roman march ..

So mote it be

... if it be Thy will, of course !x
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Paul Joseph
Posted 8/4/2008 7:01 AM (#8404 - in reply to #7617)
Subject: RE: Folk Traditions & Tales



PhD Alumni

200020001002525
Location: United Kingdom
Elves and dwarves are tricky beings ...

Do you know Bruno Bettleheim's, The Uses of Enchantment, or Idries Shah's, World Tales ?

John Barleycorn is an old English folk song that combines the resurrection myth with the making of ale and spirits ! or Spirit

(will dig it out in full [no pun intended!] if interested)
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Paul Joseph
Posted 8/4/2008 7:01 AM (#8405 - in reply to #7617)
Subject: RE: Folk Traditions & Tales



PhD Alumni

200020001002525
Location: United Kingdom
Elves and dwarves are tricky beings ...

Do you know Bruno Bettleheim's, The Uses of Enchantment, or Idries Shah's, World Tales ?

John Barleycorn is an old English folk song that combines the resurrection myth with the making of ale and spirits ! or Spirit

(will dig it out in full [no pun intended!] if interested)
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Paul Joseph
Posted 8/4/2008 7:02 AM (#8406 - in reply to #7617)
Subject: RE: Folk Traditions & Tales



PhD Alumni

200020001002525
Location: United Kingdom
Elves and dwarves are tricky beings ...

Do you know Bruno Bettleheim's, The Uses of Enchantment, or Idries Shah's, World Tales ?

John Barleycorn is an old English folk song that combines the resurrection myth with the making of ale and spirits ! or Spirit

(will dig it out in full [no pun intended!] if interested)
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Paul Joseph
Posted 8/4/2008 7:07 AM (#8407 - in reply to #8406)
Subject: RE: Folk Traditions & Tales



PhD Alumni

200020001002525
Location: United Kingdom
Oh well, no time like the present I suppose:

The English 70s group, Traffic, with Steve Winwood and others did a great version of this on their album of the same name that I might still have in the cluttered vinyl of my loft ... I still sing it in my head from time to time ... otherwise, found this version on the following web-site ... och aye the noo, lang may yer lum reek, a man's a man for a' that and, auld lang syne (another Rabbie Burns song):

http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_barleycorn.htm

Robert Bums commented on this song "This is partly composed on the plan of an old song known by the same name." Previously there were numerous versions of this ballad which described the attempts of authority to discourage the distilling and brewing industry. As a drinking man himself, Burns clearly disapproved!


John Barleycorn

There was three kings into the east,
Three kings both great and high,
And they hae sworn a solemn oath
John Barleycorn should die.
They took a plough and plough'd him doun,
Put clods upon his head,
And they hae sworn a solemn oath
John Barleycorn was dead.

But the chearful spring came kindly on,
And show'rs began to fall;
John Barleycorn got up again
And sore surprised them all.

The sultry suns of summer came,
And he grew thick and strong,
His head weel arm'd wi' pointed spears,
That no one should him wrong.

The sober Autumn enter'd mild,
When he grew wan and pale;
His bending joints and drooping head
Show'd he began to fail.

His colour sickened more and more,
He faded into age;
And then his enemies began
To show their deadly rage.

They've ta'en a weapon long and sharp,
And cut him by the knee;
Then ty'd him fast upon a cart,
Like a rogue for forgerie.

They laid him down upon his back,
And cudgell'd him full sore;
They hung him up before the storm,
And turn'd him o'er and o'er.

They filled up a darksome pit
With water to the brim,
The heaved in John Barleycorn,
There let him sink or swim.

They laid him out upon the floor,
To work him farther woe,
And still, as signs of life appear'd,
They toss'd him to and fro'.

They wasted, o'er a scorching flame,
The marrow of his bones;
But a Miller used him worst of all,
For he crush'd him between two stones.

And they hae ta'en his very heart's blood,
And drank it round and round;
And still the more and more they drank,
Their joy did more abound.

John Barleycorn was a hero bold
Of noble enterprise.
For if ye do but taste his blood,
'Twill make your courage rise.

'Twill make a man forget his woe;
'Twill heighten all his joy;
'Twill make the widow's heart to sing,
Though the tear were in her eye.

Then let us toast John Barleycorn,
Each man a glass in hand,
And may his great prosperity
Ne'er fail in old, Scotland.

Top of the page Bottom of the page
Paul Joseph
Posted 1/26/2009 9:13 AM (#13395 - in reply to #8405)
Subject: RE: Folk Traditions & Tales



PhD Alumni

200020001002525
Location: United Kingdom
Reminded of this thread by friend Cause's comments about Faust ... the first song cited above, The Demon Lover especially, about a maid who makes a rather mistaken marriage choice ... interesting how old tales and songs resonate across cultures.

Top of the page Bottom of the page
Aquarius
Posted 1/26/2009 2:41 PM (#13403 - in reply to #7617)
Subject: RE: Folk Traditions & Tales



UMS Guest

Posts: 1932
100050010010010010025
Location: United Kingdom

Ah! How about one of my latest offerings by the name of

‘When Creation Was Began, According To 'The Legend of Uranus and Gaia'?

A Tale for the Aquarian Age

Top of the page Bottom of the page
Paul Joseph
Posted 1/27/2009 6:04 AM (#13405 - in reply to #13403)
Subject: RE: Folk Traditions & Tales



PhD Alumni

200020001002525
Location: United Kingdom
Thank you Aquarius, and a very interesting offering it is too !
Top of the page Bottom of the page
Jump to page : 1
Now viewing page 1 [25 messages per page]
Jump to forum :
Search this forum
Printer friendly version
E-mail a link to this thread

(Delete all cookies set by this site)
Running MegaBBS ASP Forum Software
© 2002-2016 PD9 Software